Narratives in the classroom: A tale of affordances and missed opportunities

Hadar Netz, Aliza Segal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Oral narratives are typically examined through the lens of identity performance. In contrast, in the current study narratives are investigated from a pedagogic angle, focusing on their role in meaning-making processes in the classroom and shedding light on pedagogic affordances and missed opportunities surrounding the narratives. Data are drawn from two different settings: classes of students identified as gifted (grades 5–8, US) and mainstream classes (grades 5–6, Israel). Quantitative analysis reveals different frequencies in the two corpora: x¯=8.06 narratives per hour in the US classes, and x¯=1.4 narratives per hour in the Israeli classes. Microanalysis reveals differences between spontaneously emerging vs. strategically elicited narratives. Whereas the former typically engender a cluster of narratives that are integrated into academic talk, the latter tend to remain within the confines of Initiation-Response-Feedback, as students attempt to align their voices with the authoritative voices of teacher or curriculum, and thus their pedagogic potential remains unrealized.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100937
JournalLinguistics and Education
Volume64
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2021

Keywords

  • Classroom discourse
  • Discourse genres
  • Meaning-making
  • Oral narratives
  • Stories
  • Teacher uptake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Education
  • Linguistics and Language

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