New targeting strategies in drug therapy of inflammatory bowel disease: Mechanistic approaches and opportunities

Omri Wolk, Svetlana Epstein, Viktoriya Ioffe-Dahan, Shimon Ben-Shabat, Arik Dahan

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an exceptional scenario with regard to drug targeting, as oral administration has the potential to deliver the drug directly to the site(s) of action. Consequently, retention of the drug within the intestinal lumen and tissue, rather than systemic absorption, is frequently desirable. Areas covered: In this article, the traditional drug-delivery strategies used in IBD are briefly summarized. These include rectal dosage forms and oral systems that target the lower intestine/colon by pH-, time-, microflora-, and pressure-dependent mechanisms. Then, the article offers an updated overview of recently developed delivery systems aimed to achieve maximal drug concentrations in the inflamed intestinal tissues with minimal systemic side effects. These include antibodies, small molecules, Janus kinase inhibitors, particulate carrier systems, anti-inflammatory peptides, gene therapy, and transgenic bacteria. The various approaches are reviewed, and the challenges that still remain to be overcome are discussed. Expert opinion: The molecular revolution of the past decade profoundly influenced the treatment and management of IBD. In the coming years, this trend is expected to continue. Yet, many challenges are still ahead. A strong collaborative effort by experts from different fields is encouraged and necessary to maximize our success in IBD drug targeting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1275-1286
Number of pages12
JournalExpert Opinion on Drug Delivery
Volume10
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2013

Keywords

  • Anti-inflammatory peptides
  • Antibodies
  • Crohn's disease
  • Drug delivery/targeting
  • Gene therapy/delivery
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • JAK inhibitors
  • Particulate systems
  • Tofacitinib
  • Transgenic bacteria
  • Ulcerative colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science

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