Nucleic acid fragmentation on the millisecond timescale using a conventional X-ray rotating anode source: Application to protein-DNA footprinting

Arnon Henn, Jacob Halfon, Itai Kela, Itzhak Orion, Irit Sagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nucleic acid fragmentation (footprinting) by ·OH radicals is used often as a tool to probe nucleic acid structure and nucleic acid-protein interactions. This method has proven valuable because it provides structural information with single base pair resolution. Recent developments in the field introduced the 'synchrotron X-ray footprinting' method, which uses a high-flux X-ray source to produce single base pair fragmentation of nucleic acid in tens of milliseconds. We developed a complementary method that utilizes X-rays generated from a conventional rotating anode machine in which nucleic acid footprints can be generated by X-ray exposures as short as 100-300ms. Our theoretical and experimental studies indicate that efficient cleavage of nucleic acids by X-rays depends upon sample preparation, energy of the X-ray source and the beam intensity. In addition, using this experimental set up, we demonstrated the feasibility of conducting X-ray footprinting to produce protein-DNA protection portraits at subsecond timescales.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere122
JournalNucleic Acids Research
Volume29
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2020
Externally publishedYes

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