Objects and Events as Determinants of Parallel Processing in Dual Tasks: Evidence From the Backward Compatibility Effect

Ravid Ellenbogen, Nachshon Meiran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

The backward-compatibility effect (BCE) is a major index of parallel processing in dual tasks and is related to the dependency of Task 1 performance on Task 2 response codes (Hommel, 1998). The results of four dual-task experiments showed that a BCE occurs when the stimuli of both tasks are included in the same visual object (Experiments 1 and 2) or belong to the same perceptual event (Experiments 3 and 4). Thus, the BCE may be modulated by factors that influence whether both task stimuli are included in the same perceptual event (objects, as studied in cognitive experiments, being special cases of events). As with objects, drawing attention to a (selected) event results in the processing of its irrelevant features and may interfere with task execution.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)152-167
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2011

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Dual task
  • Event perception
  • Gestalt
  • Parallel processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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