On a fast-track to adulthood: social integration and identity formation experiences of young-adults of 1.5 generation immigrants

Pnina Dolberg, Karin Amit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study focuses on the dynamic nature of social integration and local identity formation as experienced by young-adult immigrants who arrived in Israel as children or adolescents (1.5 generation) from the former Soviet Union (FSU). 1.5 generation immigrants (1.5GI) are versed in the cultures of both origin and host countries while not fully belonging to either, and as young adults are challenged by both cultural and developmental transitions. Young adults in industrialized societies nowadays experience a stage of ‘emerging adulthood’ characterized by uncertainty and inquiry. However, it is not clear how 1.5GI experience this stage. Based on in-depth interviews with 25 FSU 1.5GI, thematic analysis of the data led to four categories: 1) Segregation in childhood and adolescence; 2) Military service as a turning point, where their substantial integration and Israeli identity began to form; 3) A fast-track to adulthood on their own: 1.5GI cannot fully enjoy the emerging adulthood period, and move rapidly into adulthood; and 4) A spectrum of identities: varying degrees of dominance of Israeli vs. FSU identity. The study examines identity formation as an ongoing process, stresses specific stages in the lives of young immigrants, and their implications for 1.5GI identity and integration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)252-271
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2023
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • 1.5 generation immigrants
  • Israel
  • emerging adulthood
  • immigrants’ identity
  • young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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