On the observability of the spacecraft attitude and angular rate estimation problem

Avishy Carmi, Yaakov Oshman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The observability of the attitude and angular rate estimation problem is analyzed using notions from nonlinear systems theory. Exploiting the distinctive structure of the system, expressions for its Lie derivatives of any order are derived. The observability mapping is then constructed and analyzed, yielding that the system is non-uniformly observable. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the system to become unobservable are derived. It is further shown that the angular rate unobservability conditions, thus derived, are a generalization of previously obtained results. Additionally, the observability of the inertia tensor is examined, and it is shown that the inertia is non-uniformly observable. A sufficient condition is given under which the momentum wheel control input renders the inertia unobservable. This phenomenon is numerically demonstrated using a Bayesian grid-based filter that is applied to the estimation of the attitude and angular rate of a spacecraft subjected to inertia tensor uncertainty.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe F. Landis Markley Astronautics Symposium - Advances in the Astronautical Sciences
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the American Astronautical Society F. Landis Markley Astronautics Symposium
Pages445-463
Number of pages19
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2008
Externally publishedYes
EventAmerican Astronautical Society F. Landis Markley Astronautics Symposium - Cambridge, MD, United States
Duration: 29 Jun 20082 Jul 2008

Publication series

NameAdvances in the Astronautical Sciences
Volume132
ISSN (Print)0065-3438

Conference

ConferenceAmerican Astronautical Society F. Landis Markley Astronautics Symposium
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityCambridge, MD
Period29/06/082/07/08

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