On the role of multiple interactions in remote aftershock triggering: The Landers and the Hector Mine case studies

A. Ziv

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The observed seismicity rate increase after large earthquakes in sites that are located several source lengths away from the mainshock centroid poses a major problem. This is because the static stress change induced by a mainshock in that region seems to be insignificant, and the dynamic stress changes can only enhance the seismicity during the passage of the seismic waves but not at later times. In quest for a physically viable triggering mechanism for delayed aftershocks in remote sites, we examine earthquake activities in remote sites that were triggered by two California earthquakes, the magnitude 7.1 Hector Mine earthquake and the magnitude 7.3 Landers earthquake. We introduce a new method for quantifying the degree to which the triggering effect of each aftershock is locally more important than the triggering effect of the mainshock. We apply this method to the Landers and the Hector Mine remote aftershock sequences. We show that multiple stress transfers from early aftershocks to later aftershocks played an important role in the enhancement of both the Landers and the Hector Mine aftershock activities in remote sites. We present a time-space diagram of the Hector Mine remote aftershock sequence in the Imperial Valley, which shows that this sequence is made up of several subsequences and that the onset of activity migrated southward.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-89
Number of pages10
JournalBulletin of the Seismological Society of America
Volume96
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'On the role of multiple interactions in remote aftershock triggering: The Landers and the Hector Mine case studies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this