Parent-adolescent coping with prolonged geopolitical conflict: A qualitative analysis focusing on distress and resilience

Dafna Albala, Stav Shapira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adolescents who were raised in conflict-ridden areas may face unique challenges that may also impact their transition to adulthood. We explored coping processes, distress symptoms, and resilience resources of late adolescents and their parents residing in Israeli communities bordering Gaza and exposed to ongoing conflict-related violence. We conducted in-depth interviews with late adolescents and one of their parents (n = 8 dyads, 16 individual interviews). Four main themes emerged: (a) dynamic adaptation – complex movement between coping styles; (b) distress symptoms; (c) siblingship – the central role of siblings in shaping adolescent resilience; and (d) community impacts – the ways in which social and physical environment can foster resilience. The findings broaden existing coping theories and offer practical implications for practitioners providing support to populations exposed to prolonged conflicts.

Original languageEnglish
JournalFamily Process
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 30 Aug 2023

Keywords

  • collective stress
  • coping styles
  • distress symptoms
  • parent-adolescent relationship
  • prolonged conflicts
  • resilience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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