Patterns of early change in interpersonal problems and their relationship to nonverbal synchrony and multidimensional outcome

Wolfgang Lutz, Jessica N. Prinz, Brian Schwartz, Jane Paulick, Desiree Schoenherr, Anne Katharina Deisenhofer, Patrick Terhürne, Kaitlyn Boyle, Uwe Altmann, Bernhard Strauß, Eshkol Rafaeli, Dana Atzil-Slonim, Eran Bar-Kalifa, Julian Rubel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Early change is an increasing area of investigation in psychotherapy research. In this study, we analyzed patterns of early change in interpersonal problems and their relationship to nonverbal synchrony and multiple outcome measures for the first time. We used growth mixture modeling to identify different latent classes of early change in interpersonal problems with 212 patients who underwent cognitive-behavioral treatment including interpersonal and emotion-focused elements. Furthermore, videotaped sessions were analyzed using motion energy analysis, providing values for the calculation of nonverbal synchrony to predict early change in interpersonal problems. The relationship between early change patterns and symptoms as well as overall change in interpersonal problems was also investigated. Three latent subgroups were identified: 1 class with slow improvement (n X 145), 1 class with fast improvement (n X 12), and 1 early deterioration class (n X 55). Lower levels of early nonverbal synchrony were significantly related to fast improvement in interpersonal change patterns. Furthermore, such patterns predicted treatment outcome in symptoms and interpersonal problems. The results suggest that nonverbal synchrony is associated with early change patterns in interpersonal problems, which are also predictive of treatment outcome. Limitations of the applied methods as well as possible applications in routine care are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)449-461
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Counseling Psychology
Volume67
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2020

Keywords

  • Growth mixture modeling
  • Motion energy analysis
  • Nonverbal synchrony
  • Patterns of early change in interpersonal problems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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