Peer rejection during adolescence: Psychological long-term effects—a brief report

Rachel Lev-Wiesel, Orit Nuttman-Shwartz, Rotem Sternberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study aimed to examine the psychological long-term effects of social peer rejection (SPR) experienced during adolescence as retrospectively perceived by young adults. A convenient sample of 387 undergraduate university students were administered self-report questionnaires consisting of the following measures: demographic variables, traumatic life events, SPR, PTSD, depression, potency and the belief in the existence of social support. Results indicated that about one-third of the participants reported having experienced SPR during adolescence. They perceived it as their most traumatic event. SPR and the belief in the existence of social support determined the PTSD severity, whereas the SPR, potency, and PTSD determined the level of depression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-142
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Loss and Trauma
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatric Mental Health
  • Social Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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