Perceived poverty, perceived income adequacy and loneliness in Israeli young adults: Are social capital and neighbourhood capital resilience factors?

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8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Loneliness is a severe risk factor that has been linked to diminished health outcomes and low quality of life across ages. Young adults have been identified as a high-risk group for experiencing loneliness, but only a few studies have explored the economic and social determinants of loneliness in this age group. Taking a social inequality approach to health, with loneliness as a focus, this study examined: (a) the associations between the following factors – subjective social status (SSS) indicators (perceived poverty and perceived income adequacy), offline and online social capital, and neighbourhood capital – and loneliness; and (2) whether social and neighbourhood capital were moderators in the association between SSS and loneliness. Cross-sectional data for individuals aged 20–29 were taken from the 2017 Israeli Social Survey (N = 1,508). Employing multinomial logit models, we found that perceived poverty was a strong predictor of loneliness. Greater social and neighbourhood capital decreased loneliness, whereas a higher use of online social networks increased loneliness. Neighbourhood capital and perceived trust were moderators, whereas trust was a resilience factor, neighbourhood capital strengthened the negative effect of perceived poverty on loneliness. To reduce the prevalence of loneliness in young adults, policymakers should examine various means of enhancing social and neighbourhood capital along with moderating the use of online social networks. However, they should be aware that interventions of this kind can do little to buffer the strong effect of perceived poverty on loneliness, as in most cases the effect of perceived poverty on the probability of loneliness is not ameliorated by improved social or neighbourhood resources.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)668-684
Number of pages17
JournalHealth and Social Care in the Community
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2022

Keywords

  • loneliness
  • moderation
  • perceived income adequacy
  • perceived poverty
  • social and neighbourhood capital
  • young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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