Perceived scarcity, habits, environmental att itudes, and price sensitivity: How do they interact with preferences towards greywater systems?

Anat Tchetchik, Dan Kaufman, Vered Blass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Numerous areas around the world face water shortages. According to the OECD, these shortages are only expected to increase. This situation requires us to think in terms of water savings, substitutes, and recycling, which in turn has led to growing interest in the reuse of wastewater, including the domestic use of greywater. The success of this solution, however, depends on households' willingness to adopt it and their preferences towards the system's specific att ributes. Israel serves as an interesting case study, as on the one hand, greywater systems are still a new phenomenon to the Israeli consumer, and on the other, Israel has undergone a reverse process; after long history of severe water scarcity, new water desalination plants are perceived as a panacea to the country's water shortage problem. Using a discrete choice approach and accounting for several moderators, such as perceived water scarcity, preferences towards household-scale greywater systems in Israel are estimated. Three segments are found most likely to adopt the system: people who exhibit strong proenvironmental behaviour and att itudes; people who save water for the sake of the country; and people who perceive saving water as a value in itself. Two segments are found least likely to adopt the system: people who hold anthropocentric att itudes that favour human domination of nature, and people who perform water saving routines in order to save costs. Policy implications and suggestions are derived.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)273-293
Number of pages21
JournalBuilt Environment
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Urban Studies

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