Perinatal factors influencing infant feeding practices at birth: the Bedouin Infant Feeding Study

Michele R. Forman, Heinz W. Berendes, Gillian Lewando‐Hundt, Batia Sarov, Lechaim Naggan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    8 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Summary. Bedouin Arab women delivering newborns at Soroka Medical Center, Israel, during 1 year were interviewed in hospital to determine the factors influencing infant feeding practices at birth. Eighty‐six per cent breastfed, 11% breast and bottlefed, and 3% bottlefed at birth. Based on a multiple logistic regression analysis, the factors that significantly reduced the odds ratio (OR) of exclusive breastfeeding vs. breast and bottle feeding or bottle feeding at birth include: delivering during the high birth season (OR = 0.49); maternal recall of feeling unwell during pregnancy (OR = 0.59); delivering a low birthweight newborn (OR = 0.10); a newborn diagnosed with major malformations (OR = 0.30) or with major illnesses (OR = 0.32); and delivering by Cae‐sarean section (OR = 0.09). In contrast, multiparae experienced an increased odds (OR = 1.67) of breastfeeding. Among primiparae, the factors that significantly reduced the odds of exclusive breastfeeding include: delivering during the high birth season (OR = 0.47); delivering a low birthweight newborn (OR = 0.12); and delivering by Caesarean section (OR = 0.18). Mothers of high‐risk neonates and those who deliver by Caesarean section need to be educated about the benefits of exclusive breastfeeding. Young primiparae are a challenge and require qualitative and quantitative research into the reasons precluding exclusive breastfeeding.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)168-180
    Number of pages13
    JournalPaediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology
    Volume5
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1 Jan 1991

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Epidemiology
    • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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