Perinatal Outcome and Long-Term Gastrointestinal Morbidity of Offspring of Women with Celiac Disease

Avishag Abecassis, Tamar Wainstock, Eyal Sheiner, Gali Pariente

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate perinatal outcome and long-term offspring gastrointestinal morbidity of women with celiac disease. Perinatal outcomes, as well as long-term gastrointestinal morbidity of offspring of mothers with and without celiac disease were assessed. The study groups were followed until 18 years of age for gastrointestinal-related morbidity. For perinatal outcomes, generalized estimation equation (GEE) models were used. A Kaplan-Meier survival curve was used to compare cumulative incidence of long-term gastrointestinal morbidity, and Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to control for confounders. During the study period, 243,682 deliveries met the inclusion criteria, of which 212 (0.08%) were to mothers with celiac disease. Using GEE models, maternal celiac disease was noted as an independent risk factor for low birth weight and cesarean delivery. Offspring born to mothers with celiac disease had higher rates of gastrointestinal related morbidity (Kaplan-Meier log rank test P < 0.001). Using a Cox proportional hazards model, being born to a mother with celiac disease was found to be an independent risk factor for long-term gastrointestinal morbidity of the offspring. Pregnancy of women with celiac disease is independently associated with adverse perinatal outcome as well as higher risk for long-term gastrointestinal morbidity of offspring.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1924
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume8
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 8 Nov 2019

Keywords

  • Celiac
  • Gastrointestinal morbidity
  • Long term
  • Maternal celiac
  • Offspring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Perinatal Outcome and Long-Term Gastrointestinal Morbidity of Offspring of Women with Celiac Disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this