Physicians' ability to influence the life-style behaviors of diabetic patients: Implications for social work

Revital Gross, Hava Tabenkin, Anthony Heymann, Miriam Greenstein, Ronit Matzliach, Avi Porath, Basil Porter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Diabetes is aggravated by a sedentary lifestyle, obesity and smoking. Based on a theoretical model relating attitudes and behavior, this study examined the association between physicians' self efficacy in counseling diabetic patients on life style behaviors and their counseling practices. Data were gathered from a representative sample of 743 primary care physicians in Israel's two largest health plans. The main findings were that only a small percentage of physicians felt capable of influencing their patients' life-style behaviors. Self-efficacy had an independent effect on the likelihood of counseling diabetic patients on life style behaviors, controlling for other background variables. We conclude that there is a need for enhancing physicians' life-style counseling skills, and that social workers could expand their role by training physicians to counsel effectively. This could both improve the care of diabetic patients, and strengthen the status of the social work profession in the healthcare system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-204
Number of pages14
JournalSocial Work in Health Care
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 5 Apr 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Counseling
  • Diabetes
  • Life style behaviors
  • Primary care physicians
  • Social workers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Community and Home Care
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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