Physiologically Driven Storytelling: Concept and Software Tool

Jérémy Frey, Gilad Ostrin, May Grabli, Jessica R. Cauchard

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

We put forth Physiologically Driven Storytelling, a new approach to interactive storytelling where narratives adaptively unfold based on the reader's physiological state. We first describe a taxonomy framing how physiological signals can be used to drive interactive systems both as input and output. We then propose applications to interactive storytelling and describe the implementation of a software tool to create Physiological Interactive Fiction (PIF). The results of an online study (N=140) provided guidelines towards augmenting the reading experience. PIF was then evaluated in a lab study (N=14) to determine how physiological signals can be used to infer a reader's state. Our results show that breathing, electrodermal activity, and eye tracking can help differentiate positive from negative tones, and monotonous from exciting events. This work demonstrates how PIF can support storytelling in creating engaging content and experience tailored to the reader. Moreover, it opens the space to future physiologically driven systems within broader application areas.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHI 2020 - Proceedings of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
ISBN (Electronic)9781450367080
DOIs
StatePublished - 21 Apr 2020
Externally publishedYes
Event2020 ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2020 - Honolulu, United States
Duration: 25 Apr 202030 Apr 2020

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings

Conference

Conference2020 ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2020
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityHonolulu
Period25/04/2030/04/20

Keywords

  • affective computing
  • interactive fiction
  • physiological computing
  • physiology
  • storytelling
  • taxonomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software

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