Porewater constituents inhibit microbially mediated greenhouse gas production (GHG) and regulate the response of soil organic matter decomposition to warming in anoxic peat from a Sphagnum-dominated bog

Tianze Song, Yutong Liu, Max Kolton, Rachel M. Wilson, Jason K. Keller, Jose L. Rolando, Jeffrey P. Chanton, Joel E. Kostka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Northern peatlands store approximately one-third of terrestrial soil carbon. Climate warming is expected to stimulate the microbially mediated degradation of peat soil organic matter (SOM), leading to increasing greenhouse gas (GHG; carbon dioxide, CO2; methane, CH4) production and emission. Porewater dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays a key role in SOM decomposition; however, the mechanisms controlling SOM decomposition and its response to warming remain unclear. The temperature dependence of GHG production and microbial community dynamics were investigated in anoxic peat from a Sphagnum-dominated peatland. In this study, peat decomposition, which was quantified by GHG production and carbon substrate utilization is limited by terminal electron acceptors (TEA) and DOM, and these controls of microbially mediated SOM degradation are temperature-dependent. Elevated temperature led to a slight decrease in microbial diversity, and stimulated the growth of specific methanotrophic and syntrophic taxa. These results confirm that DOM is a major driver of decomposition in peatland soils contains inhibitory compounds, but the inhibitory effect is alleviated by warming.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberfiad060
JournalFEMS Microbiology Ecology
Volume99
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2023

Keywords

  • anaerobic food web
  • methanogenesis
  • peatland
  • soil microorganisms
  • temperature response
  • terminal electron acceptors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Microbiology
  • Ecology

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