Post-decisional information search: Balancing the pains of suspecting the worst with the comforts of knowing the worst

Yaniv Shani, Marcel Zeelenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Selective exposure normally refers to individuals' tendency to favor information that reinforces and is consonant with personal views while avoiding information that contradicts their views. In this article the authors explain why consumers are willing to seek (post-decisional) information, particularly when that information might reveal they made a bad decision. Interestingly, this new approach to selective exposure also explains why individuals might choose to temporarily avoid important (and even potentially reassuring) information that may serve their future goals. We propose the avoidance of important knowledge and the search for painful (as well non-instrumental) knowledge as a counterintuitive strategy for regulating the intensity of negative feelings experienced throughout one's day-to-day affairs. This research was supported by The Henry Crown Institute of Business Research in Israel.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-210
Number of pages18
JournalSocial Influence
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Information avoidance
  • Information evaluation
  • Information search
  • Selective exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Post-decisional information search: Balancing the pains of suspecting the worst with the comforts of knowing the worst'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this