Postpartum maternal sleep and mothers' perceptions of their attachment relationship with the infant among women with a history of depression during pregnancy

Liat Tikotzky, Andrea S. Chambers, Jamie Kent, Erika Gaylor, Rachel Manber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study assessed the links between maternal sleep and mothers' perceptions of their attachment relationship with their infant among women at risk for postpartum depression by virtue of having been depressed during pregnancy. Sixty-two mothers completed sleep diaries and questionnaires at 3 and 6 months postpartum. Regression analyses, controlling for depression severity and infant temperament, revealed significant prospective correlation between maternal shorter total sleep time at 3 months and lower scores on a mother-infant attachment questionnaire at 6 months. At 6 months, the longer time mothers were awake tending to their infants the lower were their attachment scores. The findings suggest that improving sleep of mothers who suffered from prenatal depression may have a positive effect on mothers' self-reported relationship with their infants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)440-448
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Development
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • attachment
  • depression
  • infant
  • mother
  • sleep

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Postpartum maternal sleep and mothers' perceptions of their attachment relationship with the infant among women with a history of depression during pregnancy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this