Potential roles of gut microbiome and metabolites in modulating ALS in mice

Eran Blacher, Stavros Bashiardes, Hagit Shapiro, Daphna Rothschild, Uria Mor, Mally Dori-Bachash, Christian Kleimeyer, Claudia Moresi, Yotam Harnik, Maya Zur, Michal Zabari, Rotem Ben Zeev Brik, Denise Kviatcovsky, Niv Zmora, Yotam Cohen, Noam Bar, Izhak Levi, Nira Amar, Tevie Mehlman, Alexander BrandisInbal Biton, Yael Kuperman, Michael Tsoory, Leenor Alfahel, Alon Harmelin, Michal Schwartz, Adrian Israelson, Liisa Arike, Malin E.V. Johansson, Gunnar C. Hansson, Marc Gotkine, Eran Segal, Eran Elinav

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

238 Scopus citations

Abstract

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder, in which the clinical manifestations may be influenced by genetic and unknown environmental factors. Here we show that ALS-prone Sod1 transgenic (Sod1-Tg) mice have a pre-symptomatic, vivarium-dependent dysbiosis and altered metabolite configuration, coupled with an exacerbated disease under germ-free conditions or after treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics. We correlate eleven distinct commensal bacteria at our vivarium with the severity of ALS in mice, and by their individual supplementation into antibiotic-treated Sod1-Tg mice we demonstrate that Akkermansia muciniphila (AM) ameliorates whereas Ruminococcus torques and Parabacteroides distasonis exacerbate the symptoms of ALS. Furthermore, Sod1-Tg mice that are administered AM are found to accumulate AM-associated nicotinamide in the central nervous system, and systemic supplementation of nicotinamide improves motor symptoms and gene expression patterns in the spinal cord of Sod1-Tg mice. In humans, we identify distinct microbiome and metabolite configurations—including reduced levels of nicotinamide systemically and in the cerebrospinal fluid—in a small preliminary study that compares patients with ALS with household controls. We suggest that environmentally driven microbiome–brain interactions may modulate ALS in mice, and we call for similar investigations in the human form of the disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)474-480
Number of pages7
JournalNature
Volume572
Issue number7770
DOIs
StatePublished - 22 Aug 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Potential roles of gut microbiome and metabolites in modulating ALS in mice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this