Preliminary evaluation of oral anticonvulsant treatment in the quinpirole model of bipolar disorder

A. Shaldubina, H. Einat, H. Szechtman, H. Shimon, R. H. Belmaker

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    56 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    A potential model for bipolar disorder, quinpirole-induced biphasic locomotion, was used for a preliminary evaluation of behavioral effects of oral anticonvulsant treatment. Quinpirole, a D2/D3 agonist, induces a biphasic locomotor response starting with inhibition and followed by excitation, resembling the oscillating nature of bipolar disorder. The present study developed a paradigm for oral administration of anticonvulsants that resulted in therapeutic blood levels and tested the effects of treatment on the quinpirole-induced response. Eleven days treatment with valproate (12g/liter water), phenytoin (6g/kg food), and carbamazepine (8g/kg food) resulted in therapeutic blood levels and in a borderline significant reduction in quinpirole-induced hyperactivity without effects on the hypoactive phase. Valproate effects became more significant at the height of the hyperactivity response. Eleven days treatment with topiramate (30mg/kg) resulted in a significant attenuation of quinpirole-induced hyperactivity, qualitatively similar to the effects of the other anticonvulsants. The results suggest that mood-stabilizing anticonvulsant drugs including topiramate may attenuate quinpirole-induced hyperactivity.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)433-440
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Neural Transmission
    Volume109
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 6 Apr 2002

    Keywords

    • Anticonvulsant
    • Bipolar
    • Mood stabilizer
    • Quinpirole
    • Topiramate

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Neurology
    • Clinical Neurology
    • Psychiatry and Mental health
    • Biological Psychiatry

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