Preparedness for anthrax attack: The effect of knowledge on the willingness to treat patients

Ariel Rokach, Robert Cohen, Naomi Shapira, Shmuel Einav, Alex Mandibura, Yaron Bar-Dayan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Little is known about the factors that may impact on the willingness of physicians and nurses to treat patients during a bioterrorism attack. This survey was conducted among 76 randomly selected nurses and physicians in the emergency rooms of three public hospitals in order to analyse the relationship between knowledge, profession and the willingness to treat anthrax. The study finds that the willingness of physicians and nurses to come to work is 50% greater among the group with the highest knowledge about anthrax (P < 0.0001). Within that group, the willingness to treat patients suspected of being infected with anthrax was 37% greater (P < 0.0001) and the willingness to treat patients diagnosed with anthrax was 28% greater (P = 0.004) than in the other groups. These results imply that enhancement of knowledge among health care workers may improve their willingness to come to work and treat patients infected with anthrax during a bioterrorism attack.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)637-643
Number of pages7
JournalDisasters
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2010

Keywords

  • Anthrax
  • Knowledge
  • Terrorism
  • Willingness to treat

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