Private Equity Acquisitions Of Ambulatory Surgical Centers Were Not Associated With Quality, Cost, Or Volume Changes

Joseph Dov Bruch, Sameer Nair-Desai, E. John Orav, Thomas C. Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs) are increasingly being acquired by private equity firms, yet the implications for patients remain understudied. In this study we employed a quasi-experimental difference-in-differences design within an event study framework to assess changes in outcomes associated with the acquisition of ASCs by private equity entities. Using a two-way fixed effects model, we assessed the baseline probability of an unplanned hospital visit, total costs, and total encounters three years preacquisition compared with three years postacquisition in ASCs acquired by private equity versus those acquired by non–private equity entities. We identified ninety-one ASCs acquired by private equity and fifty-seven ASCs acquired by non–private equity entities during the period 2011–14. There was no statistically significant observed change in the probability of an unplanned hospital visit, total costs, or total encounters after acquisition by private equity relative to acquisition by non–private equity entities. When we compared private equity– acquired ASCs with matched ASCs that were never acquired, we also found no statistically significant relative change in the probability of an unplanned hospital visit, total costs, or total encounters. Regulators should ensure that data on private equity acquisitions are transparent and that data are available to track the long-term quality and financial implications of these acquisitions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1291-1298
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume41
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2022
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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