Protein glycosylation as an adaptive response in Archaea: Growth at different salt concentrations leads to alterations in Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein N-glycosylation

Ziqiang Guan, Shai Naparstek, Doron Calo, Jerry Eichler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

67 Scopus citations

Abstract

To cope with life in hypersaline environments, halophilic archaeal proteins are enriched in acidic amino acids. This strategy does not, however, offer a response to transient changes in salinity, as would post-translational modifications. To test this hypothesis, N-glycosylation of the Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein was compared in cells grown in high (3.4M NaCl) and low (1.75M NaCl) salt, as was the glycan bound to dolichol phosphate, the lipid upon which the N-linked glycan is assembled. In high salt, S-layer glycoprotein Asn-13 and Asn-83 are modified by a pentasaccharide, while dolichol phosphate is modified by a tetrasaccharide comprising the first four pentasaccharide residues. When the same targets were considered from cells grown in low salt, substantially less pentasaccharide was detected. At the same time, cells grown at low salinity contain dolichol phosphate modified by a distinct tetrasaccharide absent in cells grown at high salinity. The same tetrasaccharide modified S-layer glycoprotein Asn-498 in cells grown in low salt, whereas no glycan decorated this residue in cells grown in the high-salt medium. Thus, in response to changes in environmental salinity, Hfx.volcanii not only modulates the N-linked glycans decorating the S-layer glycoprotein but also the sites of such post-translational modification.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)743-753
Number of pages11
JournalEnvironmental Microbiology
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

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