PUBLICATION OF COST-EFFECTIVENESS ANALYSES AND SUBSEQUENT CITATIONS IN THE MEDICAL AND HEALTH ECONOMICS LITERATURE

D. Greenberg, O. Wacht, P. J. Neumann

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstractpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The dissemination of research findings begins with publication in peerreviewed journals and is continued by citation of the original study in other publications. The number of citations received by an article is one marker of study importance. We investigate whether the proliferation of the cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) literature in recent years is matched by increased citations of study results. METHODS: We used the Tufts Medical Center registry of original CEAs published through 2006 (www.cearegistry.org) (N 1394) to determine the journal name, and year of publication. We used the Science Citation Index Expanded (ISI Web of Knowledge, Thomson Reuters) to determine the extent to which each CEA has been cited in other publications. To control for different publication times, we calculated for each article the mean number of citations per year since study publication. RESULTS: Citation information was available for 1,301 studies (94% of studies analyzed). The average (SD) number of citation counts per article was 26 (o 37) (range 0 to 391) and the average 37) (range 0 to 391) and the average (SD) number of citations per year since article publication was 3.4 (o 3.9) (range 0 to 3.9) (range 0 to
34) and did not vary substantially by year of publication. The ten most cited CEAs by number of citations per year since publication were in high profile medical journals (e.g., Lancet, New England Journal of Medicine) and were frequently co-authored by the most prolific authors of cost-effectiveness research. These studies pertained mainly to coronary stents, implantable defibrillators, HPV vaccination, screening and treatment for HIV positive patients. CONCLUSIONS: CEAs are widely published and cited, but this phenomenon is not yet accompanied by an increase in citations. Further analyses is needed to analyze factors that may contribute to citation of CEAs, as well as measures to enhance better dissemination of this important body of research to researchers and decision-makers.
Original languageEnglish GB
Pages (from-to)A249-A249
JournalValue in Health
Volume12
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009

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