Quantitative Meta-Analyses: Lateralization of Memory Functions Before and After Surgery in Children with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

Naomi Kahana Levy, Jonathan Segalovsky, Mony Benifla, Odelia Elkana

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rationale: Memory deficits in children with epilepsy have been reported in some but not all studies assessing the effects of side of seizures and resection from the temporal lobe on cognitive performance. This meta-analysis provides a quantitative systematic review of previous studies on this issue. Method: A critical review and meta-analysis of the literature on memory performance in children with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE) was conducted. Search identified 25 studies, 13 of which compared children with TLE to healthy age-matched controls and 12 of which compared children with TLE before and after surgery. Results: Heterogeneity of the comparisons of children with TLE to healthy controls impeded drawing definitive conclusions. However, in 55% of the studies, verbal memory in children with left TLE (LTLE) was impaired as compared to healthy controls. Verbal memory performance slightly declines after pediatric LTLE surgery, but nonverbal memory tasks are not affected. By contrast, verbal memory performance is not affected by pediatric right TLE (RTLE) surgery. Conclusions: The findings suggest that side of the epileptogenic zone and resection from the temporal lobe affect verbal memory in children with LTLE. Right resection seems to be safe with respect to verbal memory performance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)535-568
Number of pages34
JournalNeuropsychology Review
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Children
  • Epilepsy
  • Memory
  • Meta-analysis
  • Surgery
  • TLE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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