Reconstruction of natural rna sequences from rna shape, thermodynamic stability, mutational robustness, and linguistic complexity by evolutionary computation

N. Dromi, A. Avihoo, D. Barash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The process of designing novel RNA sequences by inverse RNA folding, available in tools such as RNAinverse and InfoRNA, can be thought of as a reconstruction of RNAs from secondary structure. In this reconstruction problem, no physical measures are considered as additional constraints that are independent of structure, aside of the goal to reach the same secondary structure as the input using energy minimization methods. An extension of the reconstruction problem can be formulated since in many cases of natural RNAs, it is desired to analyze the sequence and structure of RNA molecules using various physical quantifiable measures. In prior works that used secondary structure predictions, it has been shown that natural RNAs differ significantly from random RNAs in some of these measures. Thus, we relax the problem of reconstructing RNAs from secondary structure into reconstructing RNAs from shapes, and in turn incorporate physical quantities as constraints. This allows for the design of novel RNA sequences by inverse folding while considering various physical quantities of interest such as thermodynamic stability, mutational robustness, and linguistic complexity. At the expense of altering the number of nucleotides in stems and loops, for example, physical measures can be taken into account. We use evolutionary computation for the new reconstruction problem and illustrate the procedure on various natural RNAs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-161
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Structural Biology
  • Molecular Biology

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