Response of the cultivated tomato and its wild salt-tolerant relative Lycopersicon pennellii to salt-dependent oxidative stress: The root antioxidative system

Abed Shalata, Valentina Mittova, Micha Volokita, Micha Guy, Moshe Tal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

374 Scopus citations

Abstract

The response of the antioxidant system to salt stress was studied in the roots of the cultivated tomato Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. M82 (Lem) and its wild salt-tolerant relative L. pennellii (Corr.) D'Arcy accession Atico (Lpa). Roots of control and salt (100 mM NaCl)-stressed plants were sampled at various times after commencement of salinization. A gradual increase in the membrane lipid peroxidation in salt-stressed root of Lem was accompanied with decreased activities of the antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6), ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11) and decreased contents of the antioxidants ascorbate and glutathione and their redox states. In contrast, increased activities of the SOD, CAT, APX, monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR; EC 1.6.5.4), and increased contents of the reduced forms of ascorbate and glutathione and their redox states were found in salt-stressed roots of Lpa, in which the level of membrane lipid peroxidation remained unchanged. It seems that the better protection of Lpa roots from salt-induced oxidative damage results, at least partially, from the increased activity of their antioxidative system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)487-494
Number of pages8
JournalPhysiologia Plantarum
Volume112
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 6 Aug 2001

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