Responses to alerts and subjective reports: Evidence for partial dissociation between processes

Gil Kedar, Joachim Meyer, Yoella Bereby-Meyer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

We conducted an experiment to obtain objective measures of responses to binary alerts and subjective reports of the effects of alerts. We focused on the effects of the diagnostic value of the alert. Alerts helped improve performance, and participants responded more strongly and faster to alerts with higher diagnostic value. However, they did not report a greater reduction in workload with these alerts. Results show partial dissociation between objective and subjective measures of responses to alerts; while compliance and reliance measures were consistent with reports of system reliance and rating, effects of mean screen time were inconsistent with reports of temporal demand, effort invested and task difficulty, and participants' performance using the alert systems did not correspond with their satisfaction with their own performance. This dissociation should be considered when evaluating the effects of automation.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013
Pages144-148
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 13 Dec 2013
Event57th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting - 2013, HFES 2013 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: 30 Sep 20134 Oct 2013

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

Conference57th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting - 2013, HFES 2013
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period30/09/134/10/13

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