Revisiting the Effects of Societal Threat Perceptions on Conflict-related Positions: A Three-wave Study

Julia Elad-Strenger, Golan Shahar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Past research has produced convincing evidence for the association between perceived societal threat and political conservatism. Based on the view of political worldviews and threat perceptions as multifaceted constructs, the present study suggests that certain types of perceived threat are actually associated with the endorsement of more politically liberal positions. Employing a three-wave naturalistic design, we examined the unique longitudinal effects of perceived threats from real-life political events that challenge either liberal or conservative values, on conflict-related attitudes, using a nationally representative sample of Jewish-Israelis (N = 437). Consistent with our hypotheses, perceived threat from events that challenge conservative values was associated with increased militaristic attitudes and decreased willingness to compromise for peace over time, whereas perceived threat from events that challenge liberal values was related to decreased militaristic attitudes and increased willingness to compromise for peace over time. Theoretical and practical implications of these longitudinal effects are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1753-1783
Number of pages31
JournalJournal of Conflict Resolution
Volume62
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2018

Keywords

  • Israeli–Palestinian conflict
  • moral foundations theory
  • party identification
  • threat perceptions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting (all)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

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