Safe and eventually safe: Comparing self-stabilizing and non-stabilizing algorithms on a common ground (extended abstract)

Sylvie Delaët, Shlomi Dolev, Olivier Peres

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Self-stabilizing systems can be started in any arbitrary state and converge to exhibit the desired behavior. However, self-stabilizing systems can be started in predefined initial states, in the same way as non-stabilizing systems. In this case, a self-stabilizing system can mask faults just like any other distributed system. Moreover, whenever faults overwhelm the systems beyond their capabilities to mask faults, the stabilizing system recovers to exhibit eventual safety and liveness, while the behavior of non-stabilizing systems is undefined and may well remain totally and permanently undesired. We demonstrate the importance of defining the initial state of a self-stabilizing system in a specific case of distributed reset over a system composed of several layers of self-stabilizing algorithms. A self-stabilizing stabilization detector ensures that, at first, only the very first layer(s) takes action, and that then higher levels are activated, ensuring smooth restarts, while preserving the stabilization property. The safety of initialized self-stabilizing systems, combined with their better ability to regain safety and liveness following severe conditions, is then demonstrated over the classical fault masking modular redundancy architecture.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPrinciples of Distributed Systems - 13th International Conference, OPODIS 2009, Proceedings
Pages315-329
Number of pages15
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2009
Event13th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems, OPODIS 2009 - Nimes, France
Duration: 15 Dec 200918 Dec 2009

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume5923 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference13th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems, OPODIS 2009
Country/TerritoryFrance
CityNimes
Period15/12/0918/12/09

Keywords

  • Safety
  • Self-stabilization

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