Salt tolerance in the wild relatives of the cultivated tomato: responses of Lycopersicon esculentum, L. cheesmanii, L. peruvianum, Solanum pennellii and F1 hybrids to high salinity.

M. Tal, M. C. Shannon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

118 Scopus citations

Abstract

The elongation rate of the stem of 2 tomato cultivars was higher than that of the wild plants, but under salinity it was relatively lower. Among all species, S. pennellii was the most succulent in all its major parts under both control and saline conditions. The wild species, especially S. pennellii, showed high accumulation of Na+ in the leaf and top and a greater decrease in K+ content under salinity compared with the cultivated plants. In all three species, Na+ probably substitutes for potassium in, at least, some of its physiological functions. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-117
Number of pages9
JournalAustralian Journal of Plant Physiology
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1983

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (all)

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