SAT0551 INCIDENTAL FINDINGS OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDERS ON STANDARD BRAIN MRIS: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

Tatiana Reitblat, Azaria Simonovich, Svetlana Kolontaevsky, Leonid Kalichman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background The temporomandibular joints (TMJ) changes is quite often ignored as a differential diagnosis in the evaluation of patients with suspicion on rheumatic and musculoskeletal disease such as temporal arteritis, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis. To understand whether TMJ changes have to be included in routine workup of patient‘s evaluation with the suspect to rheumatic disease, we assessed the prevalence of TMG changes incidental findings in standard brain MRI scan. In our experience, numerous incidental findings are found on a standard brain MRI scan, especially the elderly. A literature search revealed that no studies have reported the prevalence of these findings and their clinical relevance.Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of incidental TMJ findings on standard brain magnetic resonance imaging scans and assess if these findings are associated with symptoms.Methods Our sample comprised 65 males (47.1 and 75 females (52.9, mean age 54.75textpm17.45 (range: 18-87). Data collected from each TMJ included articular displacement, articular effusion, condyle flattering, condyle erosions, capsule enhancement, and bone marrow edema. Dichotomous data as to TMJ-related symptoms such as headaches, earaches, dizziness, clicking or grating sound, pain or soreness of the joint, limited mouth opening, locking of the jaw, facial muscle pain, unexplained teeth pain, neck pain or stiffness and difficulty swallowing, were acquired during telephone interviews.Results The most frequent finding was disc displacement (39.97.8, followed by condyle flattering (33.34.2. All findings, except bone marrow edema, were significantly more frequent on the left side than the right (Table 1). Significant associations were found between incidental findings in the TMJ and earaches (odds ratio 2.759, P=0.043), dizziness (odds ratio 2.325, P=0.031), a clicking or grating sound (odds ratio 6.492, P=0.002) and facial muscle pain (odds ratio 11.255, P=0.003)(Table 2).Conclusion Incidental findings of TMJ degenerative features were commonly found on standard brain magnetic resonance imaging. The high frequency of the findings and strong association with facial pain requires performing TMJ assessment in all patients who undergo medical inquiry for suspected rheumatic and musculoskeletal disease.View this table:Table I: Frequencies of incidental findings in TMJs on standard brain MRI (n=138).View this table:Table 2 Association between clinical TMJ-related symptoms and TMJ- incidental findings on standard brain MRI *Disclosure of Interests Tatiana Reitblat Consultant for: Abbvie, Eli Lilly, Azaria Simonovich: None declared, Svetlana Kolontaevsky: None declared, Leonid Kalichman: None declared
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1368-1368
Number of pages1
JournalAnnals of the Rheumatic Diseases
Volume78
Issue numberSuppl 2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

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