Satellite remote sensing in epidemiological studies

Meytar Sorek-Hamer, Allan C. Just, Itai Kloog

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose of review: Particulate matter air pollution is a ubiquitous exposure linked with multiple adverse health outcomes for children and across the life course. The recent development of satellite-based remote-sensing models for air pollution enables the quantification of these risks and addresses many limitations of previous air pollution research strategies. We review the recent literature on the applications of satellite remote sensing in air quality research, with a focus on their use in epidemiological studies. Recent findings: Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a focus of this review and a significant number of studies show that ground-level particulate matter can be estimated from columnar AOD. Satellite measurements have been found to be an important source of data for particulate matter model-based exposure estimates, and recently have been used in health studies to increase the spatial breadth and temporal resolution of these estimates. Summary: It is suggested that satellite-based models improve our understanding of the spatial characteristics of air quality. Although the adoption of satellite-based measures of air quality in health studies is in its infancy, it is rapidly growing. Nevertheless, further investigation is still needed in order to have a better understanding of the AOD contribution to these prediction models in order to use them with higher accuracy in epidemiological studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)228-234
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Pediatrics
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2016

Keywords

  • aerosol optical depth
  • air quality
  • health outcomes
  • remote sensing

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