Screening and receiving information for intimate partner violence in healthcare settings: A cross-sectional study of Arab and Jewish women of childbearing age in Israel

Nihaya Daoud, Alexandra Berger-Polsky, Ruslan Sergienko, Patricia O'Campo, Rebecca Leff, Ilana Shoham-Vardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives We studied the proportion of women who have ever been screened (ES) for intimate partner violence (IPV) in a healthcare setting, received information (RI) about relevant services, or both, and explored disparities in screening and information provision by ethnicity and other characteristics. Design In 2014-2015, we undertook a cross-sectional study, conducting interviews using a structured questionnaire among a stratified sample of 1401 Arab and Jewish women in Israel. Setting A sample of 63 maternal and child health clinics (MCH) clinics in four geographical districts. Participants Women aged 16-48 years, pregnant or up to 6 months after childbirth. Primary and secondary outcome measures We used multivariable generalised estimating equation analysis to determine characteristics of women who were ES (Has anyone at the healthcare services (HCS) ever asked you whether you have experienced IPV?); RI (Have you ever received information about what to do if you experience IPV?); and both (ES&RI). Results Less than half of participants (48.8%) reported ES; 50.5% RI; and 30% were both ES&RI. Having experienced any IPV was not associated with ES or ES&RI, but was associated with RI in an unexpected direction. Women at higher risk for IPV (Arab minority women, lower education, unmarried) were less likely to report being ES, RI or both. The OR and 95% CI for not ER&RI were: 1.58 (1.00 to 2.49) among Arab compared with Jewish women; 1.95 (1.42 to 2.66) among low education versus academic education women; 1.34 (1.03 to 1.73) among not working versus working. ES, RI and both differ across districts. Conclusions While Israel mandates screening and providing information regarding IPV for women visiting the HCS, we found inequalities, suggesting inconsistencies in policy implementation and missed opportunities to detect IPV. To increase IPV screening and information provision, the ministry of health should circulate clarification and provide support to healthcare providers to conduct these activities.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere022996
JournalBMJ Open
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2019

Keywords

  • health care services
  • information provision on services
  • intimate partner violence screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (all)

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