Seasonal and inter-annual variability of net primary production in the NW Iberian margin (1998–2016) in relation to wind stress and sea surface temperature

P. P. Beca-Carretero, J. Otero, P. E. Land, S. Groom, X. A. Álvarez-Salgado

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Seasonal and inter-annual variability of satellite-derived net primary production (NPP) in the NW Iberian margin and its relationship with the offshore Ekman transport (-Qx) and a variety of sea surface temperature (SST) indices have been examined over the period 1998–2016. Seasonality explained about 55% of NPP variability over the shelf and the adjacent ocean. Maximum NPP rates occurred by May in the adjacent ocean, and were delayed until July over the shelf. The excess production (ΔNPP) over the shelf compared to the ocean domain represented 0.45 ± 0.02 g C m−2 d−1 or 37 ± 2% of the total NPP and peaked in August, in between the maximum -Qx and the maximum SST difference between the shelf and the adjacent ocean (ΔSST). During the upwelling season, the inter-annual variability of NPP in the adjacent ocean correlated positively with the spring stratification (SSTstr) and the average -Qx over the upwelling season and ΔNPP correlated inversely with ΔSST. Conversely, during the downwelling season, ΔNPP correlated with the average stratification (SSTdown) over the downwelling season. The rates of change of NPP with the climate-related variables (-Qx, ΔSST, SSTstr, SSTdown), obtained from these regressions, may be used to test the sensitivity of the NW Iberian upwelling productivity to climate change.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102135
JournalProgress in Oceanography
Volume178
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Coastal upwelling
  • NW Spain
  • Net primary production
  • New production
  • Satellite imagery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Geology

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