Secondary traumatization among social work students - The contribution of personal, professional, and environmental factors

Anat Ben-Porat, Shahar Shemesh, Ronit Reuven Even Zahav, Shelly Gottlieb, Tehila Refaeli

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the rate of secondary traumatic stress (STS) among social work students and the contribution of background variables, personal resources (mastery and self-differentiation) and environmental resources (supervision satisfaction and peer support) to STS. The sample consisted of 259 social work students at three social work schools in Israel. The findings indicated that the mean level of STS was mild. Of the students, 36 per cent suffered STS to a mild extent, 19 per cent to a moderate extent and 18 per cent reported a 'high to extreme extent'. A significant contribution was made by the student's year of study, students in their second year of social work school suffered more severely from STS than did students in their first or third years. A positive contribution was made by the student's level of exposure and a unique contribution was made by mastery and supervision satisfaction to the explained variance of STS. The findings highlight the importance of raising awareness of STS and its implications for social work students, as well as the necessity of helping students cope with this phenomenon. In addition, the study emphasises the significant role of supervisors in the training agencies and the importance of increasing students' sense of mastery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)982-998
Number of pages17
JournalBritish Journal of Social Work
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2021

Keywords

  • Mastery
  • Secondary traumatic stress
  • Social work
  • Students
  • Supervision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Secondary traumatization among social work students - The contribution of personal, professional, and environmental factors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this