Seeing into the Future: Future Time Orientation as a Moderator of Temporal Distance Effects on Educators' Decisions

Tehila Kogut, Tal Eyal, Idit Sharon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research suggests that the temporal distance from decision outcomes leads to divergent decisions for the near and the distal future. As such, high-level idealistic concerns and values dominate decisions for the distant future, whereas low-level pragmatic concerns play a greater role in decisions for the near future. We examined how individual differences in future time orientation are related to decisions vis-à-vis the near versus the distal future. The results of three studies, with participants with varying levels of expertise—students (Studies 2 and 3), teachers (Study 1), and school principals (Study 2)—show that principals tend to be overall more idealistic in their choices. Yet discrepancies between decisions for the near versus the distal future exist among all three levels of expertise. However, this dominance of idealistic over pragmatic concerns for more distant future decisions effect was smaller the higher the future time orientation was (whether measured or manipulated). Implications for educational and managerial decision making and training are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)889-898
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Behavioral Decision Making
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2017

Keywords

  • construal level theory
  • future time orientation
  • idealism and pragmatism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Decision Sciences (all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Strategy and Management

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