Self-compassionate teachers are more autonomy supportive and structuring whereas self-derogating teachers are more controlling and chaotic: The mediating role of need satisfaction and burnout

Angelica Moè, Idit Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined whether teacher self-compassion can lead to adoption of autonomy supportive and structuring motivating styles rather than de-motivating controlling and chaotic styles. Teacher psychological need satisfaction and burnout were considered as possible mediators. Self-report questionnaires assessing self-compassion, need satisfaction, burnout and use of (de)motivating teaching styles were completed by 318 teachers. The results showed that the more teachers rated themselves as self-compassionate, the higher their need satisfaction, personal accomplishment and use of autonomy-supportive and structuring motivating styles. The higher the teachers’ tendency to self-derogate, the higher their need frustration, burnout and use of controlling and chaotic motivating styles.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103173
JournalTeaching and Teacher Education
Volume96
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2020

Keywords

  • Autonomy-support
  • Burnout
  • Controlling teaching
  • Motivating styles
  • Need-satisfaction and frustration
  • Self-compassion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Self-compassionate teachers are more autonomy supportive and structuring whereas self-derogating teachers are more controlling and chaotic: The mediating role of need satisfaction and burnout'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this