Self-criticism confers vulnerability to psychopathology in the face of perceived stress related to missile attacks: Three longitudinal studies

Dana Lassri, Nirit Soffer-Dudek, Sheera F. Lerman, Zvia Rudich, Golan Shahar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Self-criticism is implicated in a wide array of psychopathologies. The authors examined its role in vulnerability to psychopathology in the face of terrorism-related perceived stress. Three independent longitudinal studies were conducted on 67 undergraduates, 78 young adults, and 55 chronic pain patients, respectively. Assessments were employed prior and subsequent to operation OFERET YETZUKA, during which the Israeli Negev has been exposed to missile attacks. The expected interaction between self-criticism and perceived terrorism-related stress was found in all studies, although in Study 2 it was shown for participants with low levels of baseline psychopathology. Self-criticism might lead to general psychopathology in the face of perceived stress-related exposure to missile attacks, presumably via ruminative thinking.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-234
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Cognitive Therapy
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 14 Oct 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Self-criticism confers vulnerability to psychopathology in the face of perceived stress related to missile attacks: Three longitudinal studies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this