Sleep-wake patterns in children with intrauterine growth retardation

Yael Leitner, Aviva Mimouni Bloch, Avi Sadeh, Orit Neuderfer, Liat Tikotzky, Aviva Fattal-Valevski, Shaul Harel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to characterize the sleep patterns of children with intrauterine growth retardation, known to be at risk for neurodevelopmental disorders, and seek a possible correlation with behavior, concentration, and attention problems. The sleep patterns of 26 children with intrauterine growth retardation aged 4 to 7 years were compared with those of 47 control children using activity monitors (actigraphs). In addition, data were collected from the parents regarding sleep habits, behavior, concentration, and attention. Children with intrauterine growth retardation aged 4 to 7 years were found to have a tendency toward poorer quality of sleep than their matched controls. This inclination was statistically significant only for one sleep measure, the true sleep time. A tendency toward increased fragmentation of sleep, prolonged waking, and decreased sleep efficiency, although not statistically significant in this study, was demonstrated. Our results showed that 58% of the children with intrauterine growth retardation, compared with 40% of the children in the control group, could be defined as "poor sleepers" (sleep efficiency lower than 90% or three or more waking episodes per night). This disturbed sleep profile is probably an integral part of the neurodevelopmental profile typical of these atrisk children. No significant correlations were found between sleep quality and behavior, concentration, and attention problems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)872-876
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Child Neurology
Volume17
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

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