Stalled or Uneven Gender Revolution? A Long-Term Processual Framework for Understanding Why Change Is Slow

Oriel Sullivan, Jonathan Gershuny, John P. Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recently much attention has been focused on whether the gender transformation of paid and unpaid work in society referred to as the gender revolution has hit a wall, or at least stalled. In this article, we discuss key trends in the gender division of labor across 13 developed countries over a 50-year period. These trends show little decisive evidence for a stall but rather a continuing, if uneven, long-term trend in the direction of greater gender equality. We set out a theoretical framework for understanding slow change in the division of unpaid work and care (lagged generational change). We argue that, through a long-term view of the processes of change, this framework can help address why progress in the convergence in paid and unpaid work promised by the gender revolution has been so slow.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-279
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Family Theory and Review
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Gender convergence
  • gender division of labor
  • gender revolution
  • housework
  • lagged adaptation
  • stalled revolution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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