Starting at the beginning: Turing’s account examined

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Computability as an abstract notion, underlying any physical digital computation, was the focus of intense interest during the 1930s by mathematicians such as Gödel (1931), Turing (1936), Church (1936) and Post (1936). According to Turing’s analysis, digital computation is the process of effectively calculating the values of a function by some purely mechanical procedure executed by a TM. He argued that computation is reducible to carrying out a calculation by following instructions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationStudies in Applied Philosophy, Epistemology and Rational Ethics
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages57-78
Number of pages22
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameStudies in Applied Philosophy, Epistemology and Rational Ethics
Volume12
ISSN (Print)2192-6255
ISSN (Electronic)2192-6263

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