Stimulation of PPC affects the mapping between motion and force signals for stiffness perception but not motion control

Raz Leib, Firas Mawase, Amir Karniel, Opher Donchin, John Rothwell, Ilana Nisky, Marco Davare

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

How motion and sensory inputs are combined to assess an object’s stiffness is still unknown. Here, we provide evidence for the existence of a stiffness estimator in the human posterior parietal cortex (PPC). We showed previously that delaying force feedback with respect to motion when interacting with an object caused participants to underestimate its stiffness. We found that applying theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the PPC, but not the dorsal premotor cortex, enhances this effect without affecting movement control. We explain this enhancement as an additional lag in force signals. This is the first causal evidence that the PPC is not only involved in motion control, but also has an important role in perception that is disassociated from action. We provide a computational model suggesting that the PPC integrates position and force signals for perception of stiffness and that TMS alters the synchronization between the two signals causing lasting consequences on perceptual behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10545-10559
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume36
Issue number41
DOIs
StatePublished - 12 Oct 2016

Keywords

  • CTBS
  • Delay
  • PPC
  • Perception
  • Position control
  • Stiffness

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