Stress management and burnout prevention in female blue-collar workers: Theoretical and practical implications

Ruth Malkinson, Talma Kushnir, Esther Weisberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Occupational stress is a pervasive problem among blue-collar workers, and women employees are especially vulnerable, yet this population is rarely addressed. The study concerns a stress management training program developed for female production workers with little formal education, based on the cognitive approach of Rational-Emotive-Behavioral Training (REBT). Several strategies and teaching aids suitable for such a population are suggested. Twenty-seven women participated in the program. Fourteen of them comprised the waiting-list control group. Burnout, tension, listlessness, cognitive weariness, and work/home conflict were assessed before, at the end, and at 12 months follow-up. At the end of the six-session program, four of the five measures in the experimental group were significantly reduced compared to the control group. At the 12 months follow-up, tension and burnout were still reduced compared to baseline suggesting that REBT can be successfully taught to such participants but booster sessions are required.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-195
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Stress Management
Volume4
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1 Jul 1997
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Blue-collar
  • Burnout
  • Stress
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Business, Management and Accounting (all)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychology (all)

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