Subjective Holocaust Influence Level and Holocaust Survivors’ Offspring Financial Thinking and Attitude

Gila Oren, Tal Shavit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper expands the discussion on the effect of the subjective Holocaust influence level (SHIL) on the daily financial thinking and attitude of Holocaust survivors’ offspring (HSO). For this purpose, we asked 253 Jewish-Israeli HSO about their financial satisfaction, materialism, income confidence, willingness to save money, generosity, and miserliness, and divided them into three groups based on their SHIL. We find that SHIL affects materialism, income confidence and generosity, but not financial satisfaction or motivation to save money. This paper increases our understanding of how the subjective perceptions of HSO impact the long-term influence of the Holocaust on their lives.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)629-641
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Loss and Trauma
Volume27
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Holocaust
  • offspring
  • second generation
  • trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Psychiatric Mental Health
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Subjective Holocaust Influence Level and Holocaust Survivors’ Offspring Financial Thinking and Attitude'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this