Symptoms of ADHD Predict Lower Adaptation to the COVID-19 Outbreak: Financial Decline, Low Adherence to Preventive Measures, Psychological Distress, and Illness-Related Negative Perceptions

Yehuda Pollak, Rachel Shoham, Haym Dayan, Ortal Gabrieli-Seri, Itai Berger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The COVID-19 outbreak created numerous multidimensional stressors, to which people show different levels of vulnerability. The current paper examines whether symptoms of ADHD are associated with poorer adaptation. Method: After the first quarantine in Israel, 2,055 adults participated in an online survey. Participants completed scales probing adaptation indicators: financial status, adherence to preventive measures, mental health, and COVID-19 related perceptions. Background measures, including the level of symptoms of ADHD, were collected. Results: Adaptation indicators negatively correlated with the level of symptoms of ADHD. Financial decline explained a small portion of the link between ADHD and decreased mental health. Background risk-taking, anti-social, and pro-social behavior partially explained the link between ADHD and non-adherence to preventive measures. COVID-19 related perceptions also partially explained that link. Conclusion: This study suggests that people with ADHD are more vulnerable to the challenges created by the COVID-19 pandemic and therefore deserve special attention and care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)735-746
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Attention Disorders
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • COVID-19
  • health
  • pandemic
  • well-being

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