Synthetic hosts via molecular imprinting—are universal synthetic antibodies realistically possible?

Steven C. Zimmerman, N. Gabriel Lemcoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

219 Scopus citations

Abstract

Of the many ways to make synthetic hosts, one of the most appealing involves molecular imprinting. In the commonest approach monomer units assemble around or are attached to a template (imprint) molecule and then linked together using a cross-linking agent. Template removal ideally leaves cavities within the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) that possess a shape and functional group complementarity to the imprint molecule allowing its tight and selective uptake. This review highlights some recent advances in the synthesis of MIPs (often called “synthetic antibodies”) and enumerates a “wish list” of properties for the perfect MIP that may guide future studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-14
Number of pages10
JournalChemical Communications
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2004
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Chemistry (all)
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Metals and Alloys
  • Materials Chemistry

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