T-2 toxin effect on rat aorta: Cellular changes in vivo and growth of smooth muscle cells in vitro

R. Yarom, Y. Sherman, F. Bergmann, A. Sintov, L. D. Berman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rats were injected intraperitoneally with T-2 toxin and their aortas were studied by light and electron microscopy. The growth of smooth muscle cell explants taken from the tunica media of aortas of similarly treated animals was observed. A single large dose (2 mg/kg) or four injections of 0.3 mg/kg T-2 toxin caused damage and occasional necrosis of endothelial cells, accumulation of basement membrane-like material in the intima, and swelling and activation of smooth muscle cells in the tunica media. Three or more weeks after the last injection of 0.3 mg/kg T-2 toxin the endothelial cells were normal but an excess of fragmented intimal basement membrane-like material persisted and smooth muscle cells were still activated. Outgrowths from explants of aortic tunica media taken within 1 week of the last dose of T-2 toxin showed marked inhibition of smooth muscle cell growth. Three or more weeks after the toxin, the explants showed significantly increased outgrowths. Thrse findings suggest that T-2 toxin causes early endothelial and smooth muscle cell injury accompanied by inhibition of smooth muscle cell growth in culture. This is followed by stimulation of the proliferative capacity of smooth muscle cells in vitro. If a similar mechanism is operative in vivo, it could explain the chronic vascular changes observed after limited exposure to T-2 toxin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-153
Number of pages11
JournalExperimental and Molecular Pathology
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1987
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

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