The association between an increase in glucose levels and armed conflict-related stress: A population-based study

Maayan Yitshak-Sade, Nitsan Mendelson, Victor Novack, Shlomi Codish, Idit F. Liberty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Studies have shown stress may lead to diabetes-related morbidities. In recent years during enhanced hostility periods, the population of Southern Israel experienced alert sirens and rocket fire on a daily basis. We investigated whether the exposure to these stressful circumstances, which peaked during three large military operations (MO), was associated with increased glucose levels among the civilian population. We included all fasting serum glucose tests taken between 2007–2014, of Clalit Health Services members in Southern Israel who had at least one fasting glucose test during an MO period and at least one test drawn at other times. We analyzed the association between MO periods and glucose using linear mixed-effects models. We included 408,706 glucose tests (10% during MO periods). Among subjects who reside in proximity to Gaza, glucose levels were 2.10% (95% CI 1.24%; 2.97%) higher in MO days compared to other times. A weaker effect was observed among subjects in more remote locations. In conclusion, we found stress to be associated with increased fasting glucose levels, especially among those who reside in locations in which the intensity of the threat is higher. Since glucose may be a marker of the population at cardiovascular risk, further studies are required.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1710
JournalScientific Reports
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2020
Externally publishedYes

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